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Built Review
187
Corrugate Iron Shed
Corrugate Iron Shed
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by: Matthew Lenton [ FIRSTCIRCLE ]


Originally published on:
RailRoad Modeling

Introduction

This Corrugate Iron Shed model has been released by NOCH as an accessory building to accompany their big new Gravel Plant kit, but could of course be used on its own in a variety of contexts, being equally suitable as an agricultural or light industrial building.

What you get

NOCH’s standard top opening box is as usual wrapped around with a colour photograph of the completed model situated within an environment made entirely of other NOCH products. With the exception of a sheet of clear plastic for glazing the windows, the kit parts are entirely made from very high quality cardboard of various colours and gauges, and these are all packed flat within a polythene bag. Also in the box is a tube of high quality white PVA type glue, and a multi-page black and white instruction booklet. It is possible to view the instructions in colour by downloading a PDF from the NOCH website here; some example pages are included here.

Close up photos of the parts while still on their card “sprues” should give an idea of the extreme precision with which the laser process cuts and engraves the card. Observe especially the window frames, the bars of which are considerably deeper than they are thick.

Construction

Each of the parts is attached to the card sprue at three or four very small points of only about 1mm thick, each attachment point requiring just a tiny cut with a sharp modelling knife in order to free the component completely from the card.

Construction begins with freeing the base plate from its card along with the four inner walls which are then attached to it in sequence. Parts are fitted to each other with very precisely sized and positioned tabs. Something to watch out for is to avoid over applying glue on the outer corners of the wall joints (image 19), as there are some cut-outs that will receive parts in the next stages, and these cut-outs should not be inadvertently filled with glue.

With the four walls in place (image 22), the glue can be allowed to set while the vertical bracing members are removed from their card (image 23). These are attached all around the building, including into those corner slots that we carefully kept free of glue. The only tricky part of all of this is ensuring that these bracing parts are attached at right angles to the wall and remain so as the glue sets.

As with the walls, the roof is made up of two layers, the inner layer, which will be largely invisible when the model is finished, is made of thicker card, to provide strength, while the outer layer carries markings representing a sheet steel roof. I gently bent the inner layer around a large round tin until a shallow curve was obtained (image 27) and glued it to the wall tops; it doesn’t matter too much if a bit of excess glue staining is visible at this stage.

A little more care was taken with attaching the outer roof layer, which, because it is thinner card, required no pre-bending; instead it was glued along one edge, pressed on to the flat surface of the cutting mat, then when that was set, glue was applied to the other edge of the roof and it was pressed into place. This outer layer also has no locating tabs, so it needs to be centred over the inner layer, with due care, by eye.

Window frames were removed and glued on to the transparent glazing sheet, first, then the glazing cut out around the frames.

While those set, the corrugated cladding was attached to the outer walls, in between the bracing members. The windows then slot in between the cladding and the braces with a degree of precision which allows them to be held in place without glue. It did occur to me that, although these models are designed not to be painted, if paint was to be used, the windows could very easily be left off until painting had been almost completed so as to avoid having to mask the glazing.

Finally we attach the doors. A tiny black handle needs to be glued to a single back door which has hinges subtly etched on to its edges (image 40); there are actually two handles, one for the inside should you wish to model the door open.

The main double door can also be modelled open or closed, and for this there are optional parts for the door running mechanism. This rail, which sits over the doors, is best attached to the two doors and the assembly allowed to set before the door unit is then attached to the building. Again, there are no locating tabs for this, so careful alignment by eye is needed before committing yourself with the glue. The door opening rail is perhaps the one part of the kit where there is a rather noticeable lack of detail, with the roller mechanism appearing rather flat and toy-like.

Note that the base plate of the building has a large centre section that has been semi-cut through, I assume that this is so that it can be removed to allow some interior detail to be inserted into the building after construction (like some boxes, sacks, a fork lift truck or something) by perhaps attaching them to the plate and then replacing it. Certainly the windows are clear enough to allow some view of any such interior details.

Conclusion

Due to the precision of the laser process there was not a single case where the parts were attached at any unintended point, so that cutting through the attachment points was all that was ever need to free the parts. None of the parts were damaged, bent or distorted in any way that one might expect from a piece of cardboard. The precision design and manufacture of the parts means that there is no additional preparation necessary before assembling each component and all of the parts fit together as intended.

In contrast to injection moulded plastic kits, there was no filing, sanding or filling necessary, hence construction time was relatively short, just one or two evenings’ work will probably be all that is necessary if you’re just building it (and not photographing it!)

This is an HO scale kit (1/87) and although models in this scale can sometimes appear compatible with 1/76 or 1/72, the doors on this building would almost certainly seem a little too low for those larger scales. The completed model looks good as it comes straight from the box, unpainted, although the appearance does tend to fit in more with a railway or wargaming layout type of aesthetic, rather than with the more “hyperreal” aesthetic of some other schools of model making.

Please tell vendors and retailers that you saw this model here - on RailRoadModeling.
SUMMARY
Highs: Very high quality material, design and manufacture. Quick, fun and precise to build.
Lows: Not quite the level of detail that you might get from a plastic kit, noticeable especially on the door details.
Verdict: If you like the finished look of the model, then there’s nothing to hold you back: “You will very easily obtain a perfect result…” as the instructions say.
  Scale: 1:87
  Mfg. ID: 66107
  Suggested Retail: 19.99€, $27,00
  Related Link: 
  PUBLISHED: Jan 21, 2014
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 84.53%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 89.22%

Our Thanks to NOCH!
This item was provided by them for the purpose of having it reviewed on this KitMaker Network site. If you would like your kit, book, or product reviewed, please contact us.

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About Matthew Lenton (firstcircle)
FROM: ENGLAND - SOUTH EAST, UNITED KINGDOM

Earliest model memory is a Super Sabre my grandmother bought for me around 1972. Have always dabbled in painting and making things, and rediscovered doing that with plastic in 2008. Vowed then to complete the 30 year old stash, and have made some progress. Hobby goes hand in hand with BBC Radio 3...

Copyright ©2018 text by Matthew Lenton [ FIRSTCIRCLE ]. All rights reserved.



   

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