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Branch Engine House

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painting rocks!
I really appreciate stone buildings. I want to model them yet have been intimidated by replicating authentic stone colors. Stone buildings are usually constructed with local stone and will look like the local cliffs. While I am not a geologist, I have noticed some exposed rock faces with very different strata colors, plus sometimes rail facilities preceded industries and thus building materials had to be imported from elsewhere. Sometimes different stone was used for artistic architectural effects. Thus, I have seen stone buildings with facades not uniform in rock coloration. That is what I decided to replicate here.

To achieve this facade I started by painting the exterior with common inexpensive light gray-tan rattle-can paint. Then I followed up with painting individual stones with inexpensive acrylic hobby store paint. Colors used are terracotta, mocha, camel, sage, and some off-white.

The thought of painting each, or almost each, stone individually was daunting. I tried different techniques: spot-painting a few blocks; area painting with a broad brush; drybrushing.

None were quite right so I bit the bullet and began working with a No.4 flat brush. Insane, right? Surprisingly, no, actually. I finished this work in about 3 hours of casual dabbing while listening to music and following TV shows. It really did go by quickly.

Consider that when I admit there are two layers on each wall. Most blocks were painted out of the bottle, yet some are diluted washes. Paints were squirted out onto the prior color on the pallet - mixing together is not a worry. After the first layer dried, I would add more straight, diluted, and mixed colors on stones to suit my artistic eye. Then I stippled on certain colors drybrush-style at the end of a cheap stiff bristle brush. A few areas received a airbrushing of a contrasting color. Then I followed up painting a few more individual rocks.

To keep myself from unconsciously painting the same patterns on each wall section, I would paint one, then turn the wall upside-down, or stand it on its side. Artistically, some areas and sections look to my artistic eye to be a bit off in color harmony; I purposely forced myself to not 'pretty' it up so as to look like a utility structure instead of an architectural masterpiece.

The colors for the building trim follows practices of my Jackson Purchase & Texas Railroad, plus heavy use of the deep green exterior paint so common around the turn of the century.

Open (engine) house
If you follow RDA's directions this model should go together well. I spent about 11 hours building this building: two hours preparing and joining the walls; four getting the roofs on; two adding windows and doors and vents; another assembling the clerestory; a couple for painting. This does not count time pondering and dry-fitting as you may not have to do as much as I.
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About the Author

About Frederick Boucher (JPTRR)
FROM: TENNESSEE, UNITED STATES

I'm a professional pilot with a degree in art. My first model was an AMT semi dump truck. Then Monogram's Lunar Lander right after the lunar landing. Next, Revell's 1/32 Bf-109G...cried havoc and released the dogs of modeling! My interests--if built before 1900, or after 1955, then I proba...


Comments

You have done a superb job on the kit! I like the way you have colored the stone.
MAY 08, 2013 - 11:46 PM